MS

What is MS?

Multiple Sclerosis

 

MS and the Central Nervous System 

Multiple Sclerosis is a disease that has to do with the central nervous system. Multiple Sclerosis is therefore not a muscle disease as is thought by many people. To understand the effects of Multiple Sclerosis on the body, it is useful to first understand the function of the nervous system, how it works in general and where the nervous system is located in the body. The central nervous system consists of the brain and spinal cord.

 

Control system of the body

The nervous system is the body’s control system. The central nervous system plays an important role in coordinating all kinds of conscious and unconscious activities that you undertake every day. Think of conscious activities such as exercise, speaking, thinking and remembering. Also think of unconscious activities (reflexes), such as withdrawing your hand if you burn yourself to something. In addition, through this system we can observe all kinds of stimuli from the outside and we are able to see, hear, smell, taste and feel.

 

What happens in Multiple Sclerosis?

Multiple Sclerosis has an effect on the central nervous system, causing multiple sclerosis complaints. Blood vessels are present in the central nervous system, supplying the nerve tissue with oxygen and nutrients. In Multiple Sclerosis inflammations occur in the brain, which are often located around the blood vessels and cause a slight swelling. These inflammations occur as a result of Multiple Sclerosis, because immune cells are activated to clear up the myelin. In Multiple Sclerosis the immune cells can not properly distinguish between the body’s own substance and foreign substances in the body. The result is that the immune system is activated to clean up the body-own substance myelin. This damages the myelin, which provides a protective insulation layer around the nerve processes. This is the moment at which Multiple Sclerosis complaints arise. In the central nervous system several cells are involved in the Multiple Sclerosis disease. Because so many different cells are involved, it is a complicated disease process. Click on the link to view the animation of what happens in the central nervous system in Multiple Sclerosis.

 

An MS relapse or relapse

An inflammatory period in Multiple Sclerosis patients is often called a ‘relapse’, an ‘exacerbation’, a ‘relapse’ or a ‘schub’. As a rule, inflammation, which is the result of Multiple Sclerosis, settles after a few weeks and recovery of the nerve tissue and myelin can occur. The information transfer thereby restores. Unfortunately, this recovery is not always complete. Extensive inflammations caused by the relapse often leave a scar in the nerve tissue so that residual symptoms of the Multiple Sclerosis symptoms can remain. Due to the thinning myelin layer, the information transfer via the nerve fibers can deteriorate and eventually nerve shoots can be lost. The name Multiple Sclerosis for the disease comes from the clinical picture because there are often several (multiple) inflammatory sites with various scars (sclerosis) in the central nervous system. The extent to which this process occurs is very different from person to person.

 

Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

There are two stages (processes) that cause Multiple Sclerosis complaints:
– Multiple Sclerosis complaints as a result of the inflammation
– Multiple Sclerosis complaints due to myelin and axon damage

 

Multiple Sclerosis complaints due to the inflammation

In the central nervous system, there are blood vessels that supply the nerve tissue with oxygen and nutrients. The inflammations in Multiple Sclerosis are often located around these blood vessels and cause a slight swelling in the nervous tissue. As a result, the transfer of information (stimulus conduction) between the nerve cells in the brain is often made more difficult. In addition, the myelin is damaged. That is the moment when someone gets Multiple Sclerosis complaints. Such an ignition period is often called a ‘relapse’, an ‘exacerbation’, a ‘relapse’ or a ‘schub’. As a rule, the inflammation comes to rest after a few weeks. Multiple sclerosis complaints due to myelin and axon damage
The protective myelin layer is damaged during inflammation. As a rule, recovery of the nerve tissue and myelin can occur and the information transfer between the various nerve cells is also restored. You can imagine that as more inflammation occurs in the same area, the damage to the myelin becomes more serious. This means that the myelin can eventually no longer recover; there is permanent damage or a scar in the nerve tissue. Eventually, the core of the nerve tunnel, the axon, is also damaged and the nerve processes are lost. The name Multiple Sclerosis arises from the fact that there are often several (multiple) inflammatory sites with various scars (sclerosis) at different locations in the central nervous system. The extent to which this process occurs is very different from person to person. The reduced information transfer in the central nervous system can cause various Multiple Sclerosis symptoms. Different in the sense of severity, as well as in the different types of Multiple Sclerosis complaints. The place in the central nervous system, where the inflammations occur and where the myelin is broken down, determines the multiple sclerosis complaints you have. Inflammation and damage to myelin can also occur without multiple sclerosis complaints. The place in the central nervous system, where the inflammations occur and where the myelin is broken down, determines the multiple sclerosis complaints you have. Inflammation and damage to myelin can also occur without multiple sclerosis complaints. The place in the central nervous system, where the inflammations occur and where the myelin is broken down, determines the multiple sclerosis complaints you have. Inflammation and damage to myelin can also occur without multiple sclerosis complaints.

The most common Multiple Sclerosis complaints at a glance:

 

Acute Multiple Sclerosis Symptoms

– Relapses

 

Chronic or periodic Multiple Sclerosis complaints

– Fatigue
-Feeling disorders
– Strength reduction
– Stiffness / spasticity
– Problems with balance and coordination
– Pain
– Discomfort
– Bladder and bowel problems
– Concentration and memory problems
– Heat intolerance
– Mood disorders

Source of images: www.toekomstmetms.nl

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